Category Index

RN Reports – RN19 Sociology of Professions

2018, issue 42, Christiane Schnell and Helena Hirvonen: Professions represent an essential feature of modern societies by maintaining core societal values and engaging in problem-solving in areas such as health, law and education. However, during the last decades the appeal of professionalism, associated with autonomy, discretion and a privileged status, has diffused greatly in the field of service work. Professionalism now seems to be everywhere while the ‘classic professions’ such as medicine and the juridical profession are confronted with serious structural changes.

Read more

RN Reports – RN13 Sociology of Families and Intimate Lives

2018, issue 42: Detlev Lück and Vida Česnuitytė: ESA’s very first conference included a panel session on family structures and new forms of living together. It identified need for more extended and systematic family research in Europe. Thus, during ESA’s second conference, held in 1995 in Budapest, the Research Network “Sociology of the Family” was founded and already active with own sessions. Based on trends in family lives as such, the title later on changed into “Sociology of Families”, and then, in 2003, into “Sociology of Families and Intimate Lives”.

Read more

RN Reports – RN01 Ageing in Europe

2018, issue 42, Dirk Hofäcker and Edward Tolhurst: Ageing is an area of increasing interest across academic disciplines. The rising proportion of older people within society generates a number of challenges. These relate to costs of pensions and care, changes to older workers’ employment and retirement ages, the ‘vertical’ growth of families across generations, and changing patterns of consumption and lifestyles among older people. These topics have gained attention both in academic discourse as well as in public and policy debates.

Read more

ESA Journals News – European Societies

2018, issue 42, Michalis Lianos: European Societies is now in its 20th volume. It receives a great number of single article submissions and proposals for special issues. Our latest issue was a special one entitled “Toward a European Social Topography” and there are a number of others at different stages of completion on a series of themes including citizenship, family and solidarity in contemporary Europe. As an editor dealing with many submissions, I perceive three trends that clearly mark recent times.

Read more

14th ESA Conference 2019 in Manchester: Sociology Coming Home?

2018, issue 42, Gary Pollock: When people hear that I work in Manchester it triggers comments about football – generally ‘do you support City or United’. While the England football team failed to turn the words of the song used by their supporters ‘Football’s Coming Home’ into a reality earlier this summer at the 2018 World Cup, locating the 2019 ESA conference in Manchester arguably means that sociology is returning to one of its central roots.

Read more

President's Message

2018, issue 42, Sue Scott: I am pleased to be writing for this second issue of the new style The European Sociologist; I hope you enjoyed TES41 – we have certainly had positive feedback. Thanks again to Dagmar Danko for her editing work, and for the idea of having an issue focusing on the 50th anniversary of 1968.

Read more

Social impact assessment: The democratic citizens’ right to science

2018, issue 41, Marta Soler: Science has always been oriented to the advancement of knowledge for the improvement of humanity and the human condition. Lately however, citizens’ growing push for transparency and accountability in all dimensions of the public sphere has also pushed the world of science and scientists to show how research is leading to these social improvements. Sociology and sociological research are not outside of this general trend.

Read more

Metrics, Marketisation and the End of Collegiality

2018, issue 41, John Holmwood: The UK (or more specifically, England) is at the forefront of the application of market mechanisms to higher education with serious consequences for academics. Other jurisdictions are adopting similar techniques of academic governance with varying degrees of sophistication in the methods used.

Read more

Metrics and Socialization of Early-stage Researchers

2018, issue 41, Kateřina Cidlinská: I am writing this as a contribution to the discussion about metrics, not only as PhD candidate but rather mainly as a researcher who focuses on drop outs from the academic path at the doctoral and postdoctoral stage and who poses questions such as: what kind of people with what kind of approach to academic work leave academia? What does it mean for the future development of research if such people disappear?

Read more

‘Errors of measurement’ or ‘Impact factors are just a gimmick’: An Interview with Howard S. Becker

2018, issue 41, Dagmar Danko and Howard S. Becker: The US-American sociologist Howard S. Becker is the author of foundational studies such as Outsiders (1963) and Art Worlds (1982). He has also published best practice guides concerned with doing sociology, such as Writing for Social Scientists (1986) and Tricks of the Trade (1998). Since the turn of the millennium he has become more and more interested in questions raised by the sociology of science.

Read more

Discover FMSH International Department’s mobility programmes and opportunities

2018, issue 41, Marion Fanjat: The Foundation Maison des sciences de l’homme (FMSH), founded in Paris in 1963 by Fernand Braudel and currently chaired by Michel Wieviorka, is a national and international hub that contributes to the development, influence and attractiveness of the social sciences and humanities. The internationalisation of research is a fundamental policy objective of the FMSH.

Read more

Publish or publish (wisely)

2018, issue 41, Pierre Nocerino: In “Publish or publish (wisely)”, a young researcher lives the academic adventure – on his quest, Emile Durkheim and Howard S. Becker offer support.

Read more

Thesis Spotlights – Controlling risks or continuously preventing the worst? Risk management in large financial organisations

2018, issue 41, Anne van der Graaf: The financial crisis of 2007 and 2008 showed the direct impact financial actors can have on our societies, especially when things go wrong. Behind the crisis were financial actors who accepted, or misunderstood, the risks the different transactions brought with them. Large financial organisations stood in the middle of all of this. At the same time, the way they construct and use financial market risks has been left outside the academic realm.

Read more